Manga

This corn pestle was found on the former plantation of landhouse Girouette. It possibly shows a glimpse of what everyday life on the Curaçao plantations must have been like. Enslaved people performed heavy unpaid labor under difficult circumstances. Because of recurring droughts there was often a shortage of food. The most important source of food was the strong crop “maishi chikí”, or sorghum. After the abolition of slavery the plantations and the landhouses fell into disrepair. What remained was “maishi chikí”, which is still an important ingredient in the local cuisine. Chef Kris Kirindongo tells us how he uses the corn pestle.

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2:27 min

"For me cooking is not just something you do with your hands and a recipe. The feeling you put into it is very important for the taste."

- Kris Kirindongo

My name is Chris or I should say Kris Kirindongo. I am the leader of the Vittle art movement. The name Vittle Art comes from vittles which is an old word for everything that you can eat or drink and we present it in an artistic way.
Mortar and pestle are two of the most important elements of our traditional cuisine. I use them daily to crush garlic but also herbs for my seasoning. You can use the pestle to separate the sorghum from the head of the plant, then you have to crush it afterwards.
The pestle means more than something functional and physical. There is also an emotional side to it. For me cooking is not just something you do with your hands and a recipe. The feeling you put into it is very important for the taste.